Daughters of Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger (R—Calif.) and Martin O’Malley (D—Md.) in Class of 2013

Christina and Arnold SchwarzeneggerFreshman Christina Schwarzenegger with her dad, Arnold

Looks like the Class of 2013 has upped Georgetown’s gubernatorial connections pretty significantly: two Governors—Arnold Schwarzenegger (R—Calif.) and Martin O’Malley (D—Md.)—have daughters starting as freshman at Georgetown this year, according to the Washington Examiner‘s Yeas and Nays column.

In choosing Georgetown, Schwarzenegger’s younger daughter, Christina, is taking after her mother, alum Maria Shriver (COL ’77).

She’s sharing the “political royalty of the freshman class” status with Grace O’Malley. (For all you “Wire” fans out there, her father was formerly the Mayor of Baltimore, and served as an inspiration for the character of Tommy Carcetti).

Photo from the Daily Mail.

23 Comments on “Daughters of Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger (R—Calif.) and Martin O’Malley (D—Md.) in Class of 2013

  1.  by  Common Sense

    Props to the Voice for violating Christina Schwarzenegger’s privacy…nothing like arriving at a new school to see your picture plastered on the top of some blog.

  2.  by  Exactly

    Remove this post, it does nothing but make everything more awkward for the “celebrity” students.

  3.  by  Anna

    This is not news, and is a serious invasion of privacy. Congratulations for hitting new lows.

    Also, I love that you published a story on the overdone, possibly intimidating ‘welcome’ we give to freshman shortly before posting the full names, complete with one photo, and family connections of two freshman girls who do NOT deserve to be singled out from their classmates in such a potentially (read: almost certainly) harmful way.

    This represents a distinct failure at ethics, human decency, and life in general.

  4.  by  jeff

    the fact that you had to grab that picture from the daily fail should tell you guys something……

  5.  by  Oh come on

    Come on, people – it’d be one thing if the Voice were “breaking” this as a scoop. But this is in Washington Examiner, which means it is open knowledge to thousands already. Besides, what do you think, no one was going to get suspicious when the girl next to them in Problem of God had the last name Schwarzenegger? You can look her up in the student directory and everything (unlike, say, JTIII).

    As for photos, anyone could do the same thing that the Voice probably did, which is search for her in Google images. Big deal.

    None of this should be a big deal; there are “celebrity kids” at GU all the time. Heck, there’s a certain SFS’08 grad whose official name was “His Royal Highness Prince Philipos” – not exactly inconspicuous. Does anyone really thing Georgetown students are going to bother them?

  6.  by  A.G.

    Does anyone really think Georgetown students know how to spell ‘think’? Yes, but I suppose they might not be correct.

    That others have done something is not a defense for an action, and there is a difference between the following: 1- knowledge being publicly available, 2- knowledge which someone can look up, 3- knowledge which someone should look up, or could have a legitimate reason for looking up, 4- knowledge which can be published, and 5 – knowledge which should be published.

    The last two are particularly important – one could find her by looking in the directory only if they were searching randomly, reading the whole directory, or looking specifically for her. Publishing the information changes the game completely in ways which cannot be ignored.

    Your last paragraph bolsters the point you are pathetically trying to argue against: this shouldn’t be a big deal. So why is it in the Examiner and why is it a blog post on Vox?

  7.  by  Anonymous

    Shame on you Voice and Juliana Brint-what a disgrace!

  8.  by  Oh come on

    “Does anyone really think Georgetown students know how to spell ‘think’? Yes, but I suppose they might not be correct.”

    Pointing out typos – the surest sign of someone grasping for straws in an online debate.

    “That others have done something is not a defense for an action”

    That other media outlets have reported something is a statement of newsworthiness, however. Insofar as it is Vox’s mission to report on newsworthy matters, the publication of these facts by other media outlets (e.g. NBC Washington – http://www.nbcwashington.com/around-town/events/Governors-Kids-Moving-Into-DC-Dorms-56917632.html ) lends credibility to the Voice’s decision.

    “The last two are particularly important – one could find her by looking in the directory only if they were searching randomly, reading the whole directory, or looking specifically for her. Publishing the information changes the game completely in ways which cannot be ignored.”

    It is widely understood that public figures have very different expectations of privacy than the average person. The courts have upheld this standard as well. ‘Changing the game’ is accepted practice when it comes to celebrities.

    “Your last paragraph bolsters the point you are pathetically trying to argue against: this shouldn’t be a big deal. So why is it in the Examiner and why is it a blog post on Vox?”

    Because they are celebrities by virtue of birth, just as Greg Monroe or Vee Sanford are celebrities by virtue of their athletic talents.

  9.  by  A.G.

    About the typos – mostly I was just being bitchy.

    The idea “That other media outlets have reported something is a statement of newsworthiness” relies on the presupposition that media outlets generally report things which are newsworthy. Even if you confine your definition of ‘media outlets’ to ‘media outlets which purport to be news outlets’ you can not possibly be serious in advancing this as an argument.

    The children of governors, while they might be thrust into public life, are not properly public figures or celebrities. Even if a court were to consider the opposite true, that would not constitute a statement on ethics. This is still not an argument for Vox or any other news outlet to publish this information.

    I will ignore the part of your argument where your defense rests upon something being ‘widely understood’ or ‘accepted’ for reasons that should be obvious.

    Comparing these girls to people who are athletic celebrities does not make sense. The circumstances of one’s birth are not intrinsic and self determining the way individual abilities are. Further, athletes and others who parlay ability into celebrity are consenting in some way to their own fame. That cannot be said of people who are born into celebrity.

    Try harder. (See, that’s me being bitchy again. I don’t really think you’re trying at all, so writing ‘try harder’ doesn’t really make sense.)

  10.  by  Oh come on

    Furthermore – as a standard practice (not saying the Voice did this, but I’m guessing the Examiner and definitely NBC did) media outlets contact the press representatives of public figures before publishing such information. This is CYA SOP: if you’re a media outlet, you don’t want to have all your access pulled because such-and-such politician didn’t want you spilling the beans on where junior is attending college. The fact that this was published suggests that the press representatives for Arnold and O’Malley (Kaine, whose son goes to GW) offered no resistance.

    When celebrities DO want such information hidden, they use assumed names and ask the press for embargoes when approached. Happens all the time.

  11.  by  A.G.

    I understand your point – but that’s still nowhere close to an argument for Vox to publish the information, or for anyone else to do so. There is a difference between what one can do, and what is common practice, and what one should do.

    That something is standard practice is never an argument about the moral character of an act. This is basic critical thinking, if nothing else.

  12.  by  Julie

    To disgruntled commenters:

    Guys, come on. This is basic creeper stuff that you bitches all do but would never have the balls to post in an online blog. Props to The Voice for putting something out there that would spread by word of mouth like wildfire anyways. As if we are all now on a treasure hunt to find this girl and stare at her. The majority of readers will do what I did: Shrug and move on. Do we really care?

    Now, Vox, if you post her class schedule I’ll be really impressed. And people will have a legitimate reason to be upset.

  13.  by  Wait...

    What law or document posits a person’s basic right to have no one know who their dad is?

  14.  by  Joe Hoya

    Personally I think this article is in very bad taste. Those two girls are trying to acclimate to Georgetown and this is how we greet them? I think the article should never have been written and hopefully there is a lesson learned in the future event of another celebrity child who enrolls at Georgetown.

  15.  by  Why...

    You, readers, are the students of Georgetown. You are the ones who would harass them/make it difficult for them to acclimate. Are you doing that? If so, it’s you, not this blog, that’s guilty.

    Furthermore, why are we assuming that they can’t handle the transition this way. That whole response smacks of paternalism and I would think a little bit of sexism too.

  16.  by  Emmett

    My god, who are all these nutjobs who have nothing better to do but constantly harp on Vox Pop? Reporting the names of some of the new students is as mundane as it gets. Everyone in my class is aware of who the “celebrity” kids are, and its just not a big deal. The only people who apparently think it is one are these commentators who apparently have nothing better to do but sit in front of their computers and bitch about non-issues all day long. Seriously guys, get a life like the rest of us.

  17. Pingback: Body Building Women: Lifting Their Way To The Top | Pinoy Healthcare

  18. Pingback: Vox Populi » The Terminator returns: Arnold Schwarzenegger receives MSB Dean’s Medal

  19. Pingback: Cartier sunglasses

  20. Pingback: Chanel bags

  21.  by  Random

    Just for the record, with the news that AS & MKS split, I went online to see where their kids are in college, as my kid is going to college in the fall and I idly wondered if they’d overlap. This site came up first, and I went about ten deep in google and didn’t see any more references to Gtown. So I would argue on the side of those who say it’s privacy busting and a bit classless to post it here. It’s different from publicizing, say, that Emma Watson is going to Brown, because she Chose to be famous.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>