Law Center starting loan forgiveness program for grads working in the public sector

The Georgetown Law Center recently announced that it will be starting a loan forgiveness program for graduates who go into the public sector.  Now any Georgetown Law alum who does 10 years of work in the public sector in a legal capacity and earns less than $75,000 a year will not have to repay their law school loans.

According to the Law Center’s press release, loan repayments for those working for U.S.-based government or nonprofit organizations will be reimbursed by Georgetown Law, and the remaining principal balance will be forgiven by the federal government.

The money to cover the reimbursement will come out-of-pocket from the Law Center.  For public service employees who earn more than $75,000 the Law Center’s benefits would continue on a diminishing basis.

7 Comments on “Law Center starting loan forgiveness program for grads working in the public sector

  1.  by  Fact-checker

    This is what happens when you don’t fact-check!! I took a trip to GU Law’s website and in about 15 seconds found this: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/finaid/lrap/index.html. This post is incredibly misleading. Georgetown has had a loan forgiveness program since 1986. The pres release you linked to says in the second sentence that this is a new version of the [existing] Loan Repayment Assistance Program. You make it sound like this is a brand new program and that GU Law grads in the past had no opportunity for loan forgiveness, which is false.

  2.  by  Anonymous

    It’s a blog, not the New York Times. Calm down.

  3.  by  Re: Anonymous

    That’s not an excuse. I hate how people on this blog hide behind that excuse every time someone points out an error. This is the official blog of a student publication, and this should abide by at least some journalistic standards, the least of which are FACT-CHECKING and ACCURACY.

  4.  by  gc

    They had one word wrong – starting vs. enhancing.

    Get over it.

  5.  by  Re: Anonymous

    gc, you’re missing the point. First of all, it’s not one word, the entire post makes it sound like it’s a new program. And secondly, it doesn’t matter how many words it is if it changes the entire meaning of the post. If someone said, “Obama is the President of Germany,” would you say, “You were only off by one word, so it doesn’t matter.” If the president said, “We should make war with Japan” when they meant to say “We should make peace with Japan” would that not matter because he was only off by one word? I think you get my point.

  6.  by  Sharla Jacome

    With increasing numbers of loan seekers there has been an increased number of fraudulent lenders who take advantage of the borrowers and they disappear with the collateral and the borrower cannot do anything instead he is faced with new problems.

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