2009 Professor payraises low across the country, including at Georgetown

A study by the American Association of University Professors found that colleges and universities across the country gave faculty the lowest pay raises in the 50 years since the study began, and Georgetown University is no exception. At Georgetown, full professors’ pay declined by .1 percent, associate professors were given pay raises of .5 percent, and assistant professors’ pay rose by 1.1 percent.

Meanwhile, the rate of inflation at 2.7 percent, and average pay increases at American institutions for a full professor was 1.2 percent. Most other D.C. schools were stingy, but at George Washington University, faculty pay rose by 5.1 percent.

According to the study, Georgetown professors still took home an average salary of $155,500 (and average compensation was $191,700) last year. Associate professors averaged a salary of $100,700, and assistant professors averaged $83,600.

Interestingly, the study provided a gendered breakdown of faculty pay which revealed that in all categories, male faculty out-earned female faculty. Male professors, associate professors, and assistant professors earned average salaries of $157,200, $103,300, and $89,800, respectively, and female professors, associate professors, and assistant professors earned average salaries of $149,800, $96,800, and $76,400, respectively. Percent changes in pay by gender were not available.

Georgetown had originally planned to increase faculty pay to 2.25 percent above the rate of inflation for 2009, a goal which President John DeGioia announced the University had scrapped last January. He announced salary freezes for himself and other senior faculty in the same speech.

Via College, Inc.

One Comment on “2009 Professor payraises low across the country, including at Georgetown

  1. This statistic doesn’t make sense. The University widely publicized that it gave a 2.5% raise, but delayed the raise from the usual July 1, 2009 to January 1, 2010 (which saves cash). So, the net effect would be 1.25% for the year and 2.5% more on January 1, 2010 than on December 31, 2009.

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