A wrap-up of the CAG meeting on the 2010 Campus Plan, Part 2

Earlier today, we ran a post about the general sentiment that the Citizens Association of Georgetown and residents feel toward the 2010 Campus Plan draft that the University presented in November, as shown in the first public meeting about the plan ever to discuss a coherent strategy to combat it.

For the sake of brevity—and it was still kind of a monster post—we isolated a presentation that CAG Vice President Gianluca Pivato, of “fuck off” fame, gave about the information CAG compiled when it researched the impact of students on the neighborhood.

It’s town-gown tensions by the numbers.

Pivato demonstrated the impact students living in Georgetown and Burleith have had on the neighborhood in terms of the space they take up, the trash they generate, and the 911 calls and arrests they invite. Pivato was clearly going for shock factor, and he got it, most of all with a Google Map which boasted a red marker for every undergraduate household in Burleith and Georgetown, and a blue one for every graduate student household. With more than 400 markers total appearing on the screen, the map elicited a gasp from the audience.

According to Pivato, who based his numbers on what seemed like thorough research through neighborhood listservs and city-reported statistics, the neighborhoods around the University could be described in terms of …

… the number of students currently living in Burleith and West and East Georgetown, and the number of houses they occupy. Currently, 1,109 graduate students live in the area, and Pivato and his team were able to confirm that they live in at least 79 houses, which they except to rise to at least 124 houses when their enrollment numbers increase. “[This] will considerable displace undergraduates” further into the community, he said. Undergraduates living in Georgetown and Burleith number 1,305 and occupy over 350 houses.

… the number of trash violations from student houses that neighbors report. From September to December of 2009, trash violations that CAG could definitely link to different student houses numbered 108, or 27 per month. All of Georgetown typically sees 41 violations per month.

… the number of 911 calls neighbors make about students to MPD. From September to December of 2009, four blocks of O Street alone racked up 117 calls for disorderly conduct. Neighbors made 1,650 calls to 911 for disorderly student conduct since the neighborhood began collecting information on calls over a year ago. Nine students were arrested in the four-month time span, although this number includes 61D citations that do not involve physical arrest.

… the number of sanctions students received from the Off-Campus Student Life, 123.

Pivato also mapped 911 calls over four months by region, too. One block in Burleith just off campus racked up 95 calls. A block of Prospect Street racked up 75 calls.

“I think this under-represents the real problem …. Neighbors don’t always call 911.”

CAG’s goal is to catalog every student house in Burleith and Georgetown—they’re sure they’re undercounting. A Burleith resident who belongs to the Burleith Citizens Association told CAG presenters on Monday night that help was on the way.

“We are organizing too. You’re not alone in your efforts. We’re going block by block by block and house by house and documenting which houses belong to graduate students and undergraduate students,” she said.

21 Comments on “A wrap-up of the CAG meeting on the 2010 Campus Plan, Part 2

  1. If he wanted maximum shock value, he should have included one of those “creeping hand” cartoon depictions of students taking over the pristine virgin neighborhood, like they used in propaganda reels warning about the domino effect of communism’s spread.

    Btw, that last statements reads wonderfully when substituting just about any class of individuals in for students. To whit:

    “We are organizing too. You’re not alone in your efforts. We’re going block by block by block and house by house and documenting which houses belong to Jews and homosexuals,” she said.

  2. “We are organizing too. You’re not alone in your efforts. We’re going block by block by block and house by house and documenting which houses belong to Italians and senior citizens,” she said.

  3. His numbers accurately represent the true problem:

    A single block where one or two residents overuse and abuse the 911 system for petty issues.

  4. “I think this under-represents the real problem …. Neighbors don’t always call 911.”

    Nor should they.

  5. …we know where you live…YOU CAN”T FOOL US!! BWAHAHAHA!!!!

  6. We are organizing too. You’re not alone in your efforts. We’re going block by block by block and house by house and documenting which houses belong to Republicans,” she said.

  7. Did anyone else notice the use of “it’s” on the yellow flyer? Maybe the neighbors should audit more English courses…

  8. The Altemus said to Ron Lewis and Gianluca Pivato in Georgetown, “This month is the be for you the first month, the first month of the school year.” Tell the whole community of permanent residents of Georgetown that on the tenth day of this month each man is to take a lamb for his family, one for each household. The animals you choose must be prepared lambs from Dean & Deluca without defect. Then they are to take some flowers from Dean & Deluca and put it outside your door.

    “On that same night I will pass through Georgetown and strike down every student – both undergraduates and graduates – and I will bring judgment on all the residents of Georgetown. I am the Altemus. The flowers will be a sign for you on the houses where you are; and when I see the flowers that the students are too poor to purchase, I will pass over you. No destructive plague will touch you when I strike Georgetown.

    This is a day you are to commemorate; for the generations to come you shall celebrate it as a festival to the Altemus – a lasting ordinance.

  9. “From September to December of 2009, four blocks of O Street alone racked up 117 calls for disorderly conduct. … Nine students were arrested in the four-month time span, although this number includes 61D citations that do not involve physical arrest.”

    So, to recap: Neighbors called the cops 117 times in a four month period, which resulted in only 9 citations. That’s 7%, for those of you counting at home.

    I’d be interested in knowing the number of robberies that took place in the same amount of time while police were responding to the 93% of college students watching Netflix too loudly after 11.

  10. Did you even read the article about why they voted against it? Nothing has changed in four years.

  11. 1 @J: Agree with knowing, nothing has changed. The neighbors want things kept on campus, and they were indeed right about partying getting pushed off-campus.

    2: I think this marks the only time I’m aware of that GU didn’t bend over backward for the ANC. To ban kegs. Great.

    3: I miss the Apostles for Peace and Unity.

  12. Georgetown students need to organize and go to the ANC meetings and get proper representation on these community groups.
    The Neighbors are completely unreasonable and they need to be stopped. They need to stop calling the cops for noise violations. College students are going to be loud. Nothing is ever going to change. If they don’t like noise they should move to a quieter neighborhood. Anyone calling the cops for noise before midnight is unreasonable. The power the CAG and the ANC has is ridiculous. The rerouting of the GUTS buses is completely ridiculous. Metro buses use the exact same routes that GUTS buses are now banned from running. The neighborhood really holds the university back from offering the best for it’s students. And if they don’t want students in houses off campus maybe they shouldn’t have blocked all attempts to use the wormley school. The Neighbors are completely ridiculous and won’t be satisfied until the school doesn’t exist anymore. They should have no rights to influence what the University does unless they can prove dramatic impact it would have on the neighborhood. None of their complaints have been close to justified.

  13. yeah, weeedickalesss! the neighbors are dumb. we deserve the right to break the law within the city of dc cuz we are GU students!

  14. Wait, weeedickalessss, I thought Georgetown was NOT a city and that’s why the neighbors should be allowed to dictate bus routes and parking policies? If students are bound by the laws of the CITY of DC, then you’re stuck up asses are bound by the very attributes of a city: cars everywhere, buses running, etc.

  15. Pingback: Vox Populi » Burleith: The idyllic little neighborhood that you’re ruining

  16. I just bought a place in Burleith and, being a semi-recent college grad who myself lived in residential neighborhoods off-campus during college, I have a reasonable perspective on this issue and will reserve judgment until I move in next week. I’ve been watching this drama escalate through anonymous postings back and forth on each side and clearly nothing productive is happening here.

    For now, my bigger issue is with the landlords who do not maintain their rental properties well and risk driving my home value down. I’d rather know how to get in touch with them…

    I’m assuming most students prefer indoor urination and drinking at bars rather than trashing their own houses but if it turns out that this is not the case, I won’t be sitting around waiting for the police to come handle lewd or obnoxious behavior; those people can expect to hear about it personally. I may be a little girl but my boyfriend tells me I can be a raging bitch.

  17. Pingback: Vox Populi » Comments of the Week:

  18. GU says: “Emissions must be exhausted above buildings to avoid re‐entrainment (entry into building
    through window, air intake or other opening.) Current exhaust flues are not tall enough
    to prevent re‐entrainment.”

    Does it mean that emissions have been entering into buildings on GU campus for the past, how many years, 20 or more?

  19. Watch out for these efforts to “catalog” the student houses in the neighborhood. In the 1990s, nearby activists unveiled and distributed a map supposedly showing how students were taking over Burleith and other neighborhoods- it turned out that many of the “student houses” were not occupied by students, or not even group houses. They couldn’t (or wouldn’t) explain where they got their (false) information.

  20. With regard to those maps, you should assemble one showing the traditional number of houses rented to students going back decades. I lived there as a student in the 70′s and there were a lot of student houses. The current residents moved to the “problem”. This has not been an “all owner resident” neighborhood in living memory.

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