GUSA Roundup: Live-streamed political parties

At this week’s meeting of the Georgetown University Student Association, Senator Greg Laverriere (COL’12) announced that a deal had been reached with the Student Activities Commission, making the advisory board eligible for money from the student activities fee. The Senate also passed a resolution encouraging socially responsible investing, discussed solutions to a funding shortage that threatens to end the weekend GUTS bus service, and (most importantly) announced an event we’ve all been anxiously waiting for—a GUSA party. Let’s get to the wrap:

Deal reached with SAC: In the beginning of the GUSA meeting, Laverriere read to the full senate the text of the agreement that had been reached with SAC. Laverriere said the agreement had been passed by the Finance and Appropriations Committee and that it could be voted upon by the full senate next week. In the agreement SAC agrees to make public any votes held for lump sum funding, which will be instituted next year, but reserves the right of closed votes for all policy and sanction votes.

GUTS bus funding shortage: In his executive briefing, GUSA President Calen Angert (MSB ’11) asked senators for ideas on how to deal with the lack of funds for the weekend GUTS bus service. The service has traditionally been funded jointly by the SAC and GUSA. Angert questioned whether GUSA was the right source of funding for the service.

“Lots of people use [the weekend GUTS buses.] Why is the student government of this school funding this?” Angert said.

Showing he will stop at nothing to reduce excess reserves, Senator Nick Troiano (COL’11) suggested that the advisory boards pick up the tab. Troiano noted that several advisory boards had committed to spending down their reserves to help students.

“I can’t think of a better way to serve students,” Troiano said.

Senators debated possibly instituting a 25 cent charge for taking the GUTS bus or expanding SafeRides service to include rides to Rosslyn.

Angert said he felt that expanding SafeRides so far beyond its original purpose was unwise, stating that SafeRides had already essentially become “freerides.”

“Deviating from [SafeRide’s] mission … is kinda dangerous,” Angert said.

Angert said the service costs between $15,000 and $20,000 a year. While some money had already been found, his executive would work to find a source for the rest.

Socially responsible investing resolution and new GUSA post: With 14 “yes” votes and 4 abstentions, the Senate passed a resolution that calls on the university to institute “policies that ensure that all investments are compatible with the basic values of the University” and to create a committee to advise the investment office on how to invest responsibly.

Senator Clara Gustafson (SFS’13), who introduced the legislation, said that she had talked with members of Georgetown Divest! when creating the resolution but then appeared to try to distance her bill from the group’s efforts.

“The point of this resolution has nothing to do with Georgetown Divest!’s mission,” Gustafson said.

Senator Colton Malkerson (COL’13) expressed concerns that the resolution would become a part of Georgetown Divest!’s efforts and goals.

“I’m sure this resolution will be used by [Georgetown Divest!] … I just want to make sure our support isn’t too broadly taken,” Malkerson said.

The Senate also voted to establish a new director of technology position for the GUSA Senate. The duties of the position include live-streaming all the general meetings of the GUSA Senate and meetings of the committee. The position comes with a $300 stipend.

Party in the G-U.S.A: Vice-speaker Chris Pigott (COL’12) announced that he was planning a small end of the year GUSA party. A tentative date and location were given for the party, but to prevent what would be the inevitable rush of GUSA admirers from crashing the party that information will not be published here. (But, you can figure it out by watching the live-stream of the meeting). While Pigott said that the party would not be limited to only GUSA senators, Senator Troiano’s concerns about the part being live-streamed were left unanswered.

6 Comments on “GUSA Roundup: Live-streamed political parties

  1. “Lots of people use [the weekend GUTS buses.] Why is the student government of this school funding this?”

    I believe you answered your own question there, Calen. Student government is designed to do things that are a benefit to the entire student body. It’s pretty sad that GUSA is so committed to doing their own thing that they’re unwilling to fund a very heavily used, beneficial program like weekend GUTS busses.

  2. No, I think Calen’s point was that lots of people other than students use the weekend GUTS buses. Certainly, plenty of students use them and they are of benefit to the student body, but why should the student government have to pick up the transportation tab for so many non-students?

    Is it really so unreasonable to ask that you read what was actually said before pursuing your inane hating on GUSA?

  3. The point, I believe, is that this is something that it would be reasonable to expect the university to fund (instead of paying for it out of the student activity fee that is designed to support campus groups, not the university’s lack of a metro stop…).

  4. “In the agreement SAC agrees to make public any votes held for lump sum funding, which will be instituted next year, but reserves the right of closed votes for all policy and sanction votes.”

    So does that mean that if a group goes back to SAC, post-lump-sum funding, for another request, the votes are closed?

  5. “I believe you answered your own question there, Calen. Student government is designed to do things that are a benefit to the entire student body. It’s pretty sad that GUSA is so committed to doing their own thing that they’re unwilling to fund a very heavily used, beneficial program like weekend GUTS busses.”

    Reasonable Student, GUSA funded this very heavily used, beneficial program to start with, after the university had been unwilling to fund it. The university basically contended it would be a waste of money with low ridership — I think GUSA proved them very wrong.

    However, as someone who worked with getting this in the first place back in 2006, it was my understanding that GUSA and SAC used their money to fund a trial run for a year or two, and that the university agreed to pick up the tab thereafter after they saw that the ridership was huge. Apparently someone in the administration dropped the ball, unless I’m sorely mistaken.

    In any case, as Richie said, is GUSA the best group to be funding this considerable amount out of student activities’ fee money, or should the university take this up as a priority? I mean, there are a ton of projects GUSA could fund — Grab ‘n Go at Leo’s, the football team, the electricity costs for dorms — but that the University should probably step up and do.

  6. “In the agreement SAC agrees to make public any votes held for lump sum funding, which will be instituted next year, but reserves the right of closed votes for all policy and sanction votes.”

    So does that mean that if a group goes back to SAC, post-lump-sum funding, for another request, the votes are closed?

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