ANC approves plans for new dorm across from Reiss

Ext_Northwest-peepsUpdate, 5:20 p.m. Wednesday: Earlier today, the Old Georgetown Board postponed taking action on the new structure, leaving the matter for its next meeting in September, citing various concerns.

Original Post: Last night, the Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2E unanimously approved the University’s plan to build a seven-floor residence hall across from Reiss Science Building. The construction plan for structure is expected to go through an architectural review for final approval by the Old Georgetown Board tomorrow.

The new dorm will hold 250 beds, which will put the University closer to reaching its goal of housing 450 additional students on campus by 2015—a compromise which administrators and neighbors agreed to in last summer’s campus plan resolution. According to Robin Morey, the University’s vice president for planning and facilities management, the University is already adding 65 beds this summer by bringing people out of Magis Row housing into previously unutilized rooms.

Administrators don’t yet have a plan for where to house the remaining students by 2015. “There’s still more work to do to meet the whole commitment of bringing 450 students back on campus. We are working on that, but we do not have a plan for that yet,” Morey said in an interview with Vox.

The group of architects leading the design of the building has taken several measures to address community concerns toward the aesthetics and sustainability of the new building.

According to Jodi Ernst, associate University architect, the new dorm will be LEED Gold-certified, a standard that ensures a high level of sustainability and energy-efficiency. In addition, the building will feature a green roof, and all the major trees in the area, except one, will be preserved.

Architects have also preserved space for community input in the final design of the new dorm.

“I will be working with the University and their architects to pursue a design that represents the character and heritage of Georgetown and is cohesive with other buildings on campus,” Peter Prindiville, ANC Commissioner for District 8, wrote in an email to Vox. “This is the first of many steps, and I think the most exciting phase of this project’s conceptual growth is yet to come as the University takes the comments of the ANC, community and students into consideration.”

In addition to living space, the new hall will also feature a living and learning zone on the ground floor, which will house both classrooms and student lounge spaces.

Construction of the new residence hall is expected to begin Spring 2014, last for approximately 14 months, and be ready for occupation by the Fall of 2015.

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Read the ANC’s full resolution below:

“In regard to OG 13-249 (HPA 13-439) located on the premises of 3700 O St. NW:

Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2E thanks the applicant for its bona fide efforts to meet the requirements of the Campus Plan zoning order and applauds the applicant on its quick and well-intentioned work on this project.

We are pleased with the concept design as presented. We believe the plan complements the surrounding structures and adds value to our community.

We are particularly pleased with the applicant’s concerted effort to mitigate the development’s environmental impact on the community by pursuing U.S. Green Building Council LEED Gold Certification and intentionally addressing tree removal. Recognizing the negative impact of storm water runoff in our community, we also support the inclusion of a green roof on the building.

We are also pleased that the applicant is significantly improving the landscape and pedestrian access in its site improvements.

We recognize that this development is of particular significance to this area of our community because it replaces a special space on campus. We aim to maintain the special quality of this space by requesting that the applicant pursue a design that makes the building distinctive to the campus and our community. The inclusion of certain motifs reflecting the University and its heritage on the facade of the proposed building, such as the stone motif on the neighboring Reiss Building and the motifs on Copley and Healy Halls and Lauinger Library, would add particular value to this development and promote cohesiveness among buildings on the campus.

As always we encourage input in all development matters and encourage the applicant to engage local residents.

We believe that this development will greatly improve the student living-learning experience on campus and are looking forward to working with the applicant.”

Photos courtesy Georgetown University

21 Comments on “ANC approves plans for new dorm across from Reiss

  1. Where exactly is this “Northeast Triangle”? Is it really, as the title of this post indicates, across from Reiss? Because to eliminate the green space in front of Reiss would be a travesty- especially considering how little green space that side of campus has to begin with.

  2. Wow, it’s beautiful! Definitely prettier than Copley! I’m gonna go for a fifth year just to live in this beacon of learning.

  3. The architect has an imagination not unlike that of the concrete block from which this building will be carved.

  4. Looking forward to the Cell Block reflecting “the stone motif on the neighboring Reiss Building.”

  5. This looks like what would happen if Lauinger and Reiss had a baby.

  6. @Location Please

    Yes. It’s across from Reiss. Just like it says.

  7. I still don’t understand what we’re getting out of this campus plan. Did we really agree to spend tens of millions of dollars (which ultimately comes from our tuition) and force students back onto an already-crowded campus and into this monstrosity in exchange for an end to keg limits?! It seems like we’re just temporarily placating increasingly-frustrating residents in exchange for essentially nothing.

  8. Joe Hoya is right. We should instead spend tens of millions of dollars on buying the neighbors’ homes and forcing them to relocate. Or just convincing them to move out through a rapidly escalating no-holds-barred neighborhood-wide game of chicken.

  9. Too bad we don’t have an engineering program. Maybe then administrators would see how bad this building is.

  10. That is the ugliest effing building I’ve ever seen.

  11. I’m not saying “Sorry, couldn’t go to the meeting since it was in the morning” is the most college thing to say, but…. It totally is. Woooohoooooo journalism.

  12. @Everyone

    JEEZUS the building is actually really nice. You know how ridiculous trying to build a neogothic building across from Reiss would be?

  13. @Stills

    We’re not asking for “neogothic.” We’re asking for “something that won’t look better with time as a direct result of Stockholm Syndrome”

  14. oh sweet jesus that is ugly! please no!

  15. “The group of architects leading the design of the building has taken several measures to address community concerns toward the aesthetics and sustainability of the new building.”

    i think they have thought far more about ‘sustainability’ than aesthetics here. i personally don’t care if it is gold certified or whatever, but i do care about having another ugly building on campus.

  16. Why does the administration have to build on every square foot of green space? This isn’t a North Jersey beach town, it’s Georgetown godamnit. It should fee like a campus, with space to breathe. This is an absolutely terrible idea that is ruining our campus.

  17. Joe Hoya says: “I still don’t understand what we’re getting out of this campus plan. Did we really agree to spend tens of millions of dollars (which ultimately comes from our tuition) and force students back onto an already-crowded campus and into this monstrosity in exchange for an end to keg limits?! ”

    Yes.

  18. But guise, don’t you like having fun, free late night events like laser tag or bowling?

    It’s all about making campus the hub for social life! Now doesn’t that sounds great?

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